J. Fred Talbot DD- 156 - History

J. Fred Talbot DD- 156 - History

J. Fred Talbot DD- 156

J. Fred Talbott

(DD-156: dp. 1,090; 1. 314'5"; b. 30'6"; dr. 8'8", s. 35 k.; cpl. 101; a. 4 4", 2 3"; 2 .30 car., 12 21" tt.; cl.Wickes )

J. Fred Talbott (DD-156) was launched 14 December 1918 by Willia~n Cramp & Sons, Philadelphia; sponsored by Mrs. Robert L. Bates, niece of Representative Talbott; and commissioned 30 June 1919, Comdr. T. G. Ellyson in command.

The new destroyer departed Newport 10 July for the Mediterranean, where she acted as a station ship at various ports providing an element of stability in Europe during the ffrst trou~bled months of postwar adjustment and reconstruction. Upon her return to the United States 21 June 1920, the ship took part in patrol duty on the East Coast and engaged in fleet exercises before decommissioning at Philadelphia 18 January 1923.

J. Fred Talbott recommissioned 1 May 1930, Lt. C. II. Cobb in command, and immediately began shakedown training in Delaware Bay. For the 10 years that tollowed, the ship operated along the Atlantic coast and in the Caribbeanengaging in antisubmarine training, fleet operations; and carrying out the many far-ranging duties of the United States fleet in preservation of: peace, missions of mercy, maintaining freedom of the seas, and otherwise protecting the United States' interests. She also helped to train reserves and midshipmen, thus developing not only the equipment and tactics, but the men of the Navy as well.

With the outbreak of the war in Europe and America's initial effort to protect its shipping while remaining neutral, J. Fred Talbott was assigned patrol duties in the waters off the Atlantic entrance to the Panama Canal. Following America's entry into the war with the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, the ship took up conroy escort duties between New Orleans, Cuba, and the Cahal, helping to protect the sea lanes und to move the vast amounts of men and materiel needed for victory.

Following an overhaul in Boston in January 1944, J. Fred Talbott sailed 13 February with her flrst transatlantic convoy, and, after her safe return from Casablanca, took up escort duties with convoys from Iceland southward into the Caribbean. Later in the year, after arrival 15 September, she was converted at New York and reclassifled AG-81 25 September 1944. The ship arrived Port Everglades, Fla., 1 November to act as a target ship tor torpedo bombers, continuing this important training service until the war's end.

J. Fred Talbott arrived Boston 22 April 1946, and decommissioned 21 May 1946. She was sold to Boston Metals Corp., Baltimore, Md., in November 1946 and was subsequently scrapped.


J. Fred Talbot DD- 156 - History

(DD-156: dp. 1,090 1. 314'5" b. 30'6" dr. 8'8", s. 35 k. cpl. 101 a. 4 4", 2 3" 2 .30 car., 12 21" tt. cl.Wickes )

J. Fred Talbott (DD-156) was launched 14 December 1918 by William Cramp & Sons, Philadelphia sponsored by Mrs. Robert L. Bates, niece of Representative Talbott and commissioned 30 June 1919, Comdr. T. G. Ellyson in command.

The new destroyer departed Newport 10 July for the Mediterranean, where she acted as a station ship at various ports providing an element of stability in Europe during the first troubled months of postwar adjustment and reconstruction. Upon her return to the United States 21 June 1920, the ship took part in patrol duty on the East Coast and engaged in fleet exercises before decommissioning at Philadelphia 18 January 1923.

J. Fred Talbott recommissioned 1 May 1930, Lt. C. II. Cobb in command, and immediately began shakedown training in Delaware Bay. For the 10 years that followed, the ship operated along the Atlantic coast and in the Caribbean engaging in antisubmarine training, fleet operations and carrying out the many far-ranging duties of the United States fleet in preservation of: peace, missions of mercy, maintaining freedom of the seas, and otherwise protecting the United States' interests. She also helped to train reserves and midshipmen, thus developing not only the equipment and tactics, but the men of the Navy as well.

With the outbreak of the war in Europe and America's initial effort to protect its shipping while remaining neutral, J. Fred Talbott was assigned patrol duties in the waters off the Atlantic entrance to the Panama Canal. Following America's entry into the war with the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, the ship took up convoy escort duties between New Orleans, Cuba, and the Canal, helping to protect the sea lanes and to move the vast amounts of men and materiel needed for victory.

Following an overhaul in Boston in January 1944, J. Fred Talbott sailed 13 February with her first transatlantic convoy, and, after her safe return from Casablanca, took up escort duties with convoys From Iceland southward into the Caribbean. Later in the year, after arrival 15 September, she was converted at New York and reclassified AG-81 25 September 1944. The ship arrived Port Everglades, Fla., 1 November to act as a target ship tor torpedo bombers, continuing this important training service until the war's end.

J. Fred Talbott arrived Boston 22 April 1946, and decommissioned 21 May 1946. She was sold to Boston Metals Corp., Baltimore, Md., in November 1946 and was subsequently scrapped.


DD-156 J. Fred Talbott

J. Fred Talbott (DD-156) was launched 14 December 1918 by William Cramp & Sons, Philadelphia sponsored by Mrs. Robert L. Bates, niece of Representative Talbott and commissioned 30 June 1919, Comdr. T. G. Ellyson in command.

The new destroyer departed Newport 10 July for the Mediterranean, where she acted as a station ship at various ports providing an element of stability in Europe during the first troubled months of postwar adjustment and reconstruction. Upon her return to the United States 21 June 1920, the ship took part in patrol duty on the East Coast and engaged in fleet exercises before decommissioning at Philadelphia 18 January 1923.

J. Fred Talbott recommissioned 1 May 1930, Lt. C. II. Cobb in command, and immediately began shakedown training in Delaware Bay. For the 10 years that followed, the ship operated along the Atlantic coast and in the Caribbean engaging in antisubmarine training, fleet operations and carrying out the many far-ranging duties of the United States fleet in preservation of: peace, missions of mercy, maintaining freedom of the seas, and otherwise protecting the United States' interests. She also helped to train reserves and midshipmen, thus developing not only the equipment and tactics, but the men of the Navy as well.

With the outbreak of the war in Europe and America's initial effort to protect its shipping while remaining neutral, J. Fred Talbott was assigned patrol duties in the waters off the Atlantic entrance to the Panama Canal. Following America's entry into the war with the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, the ship took up convoy escort duties between New Orleans, Cuba, and the Canal, helping to protect the sea lanes and to move the vast amounts of men and materiel needed for victory.

Following an overhaul in Boston in January 1944, J. Fred Talbott sailed 13 February with her first transatlantic convoy, and, after her safe return from Casablanca, took up escort duties with convoys From Iceland southward into the Caribbean. Later in the year, after arrival 15 September, she was converted at New York and reclassified AG-81 25 September 1944. The ship arrived Port Everglades, Fla., 1 November to act as a target ship tor torpedo bombers, continuing this important training service until the war's end.

J. Fred Talbott arrived Boston 22 April 1946, and decommissioned 21 May 1946. She was sold to Boston Metals Corp., Baltimore, Md., in November 1946 and was subsequently scrapped.


J. Fred Talbott was laid down by the William Cramp & Sons Ship and Engine Building Company at Philadelphia on 8 July 1918, launched on 14 December 1918 by Mrs. Robert L. Bates, niece of Representative Talbott and commissioned on 30 June 1919, Commander T. G. Ellyson in command.

J. Fred Talbott departed Newport, Rhode Island on 10 July for the Mediterranean Sea, where she acted as a station ship at various ports acting as US representation during reconstruction. Upon her return to the United States on 21 June 1920, the ship took part in Neutrality Patrol duty on the East Coast and engaged in fleet exercises before her decommissioning at Philadelphia on 18 January 1923.

J. Fred Talbott recommissioned 1 May 1930, Lieutenant C. H. Cobb in command, and immediately began shakedown training in Delaware Bay. For the ten years that followed, the ship operated along the Atlantic coast and in the Caribbean Sea engaging in anti-submarine training fleet operations and carrying out the many far-ranging duties of the United States fleet. She also helped to train reserves and midshipmen.

With the outbreak of the war in Europe, and the United States' initial effort to protect its shipping while remaining neutral, J. Fred Talbott was assigned patrol duties in the waters off the Atlantic entrance to the Panama Canal. Following the US entry into the war with the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, the ship took up convoy escort duties between New Orleans, Cuba, and the Panama Canal.

Following an overhaul in Boston in January 1944, J. Fred Talbott sailed on 13 February with her first transatlantic convoy, and, after her safe return from Casablanca, took up escort duties with convoys from Iceland southward into the Caribbean. Later in the year, after arrival on 15 September, she was converted at New York and reclassified AG-81 on 25 September 1944. The ship arrived Port Everglades, Florida, 1 November to act as a target ship for torpedo bombers, continuing this training service until the war's end.

J. Fred Talbott was decommissioned at Boston on 21 May 1946, stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on 19 June 1946 and sold for scrap to the Boston Metals Corporation of Baltimore, Maryland on 22 December 1946.


Service history

J. Fred Talbott departed Newport, Rhode Island 10 July for the Mediterranean, where she acted as a station ship at various ports providing an element of stability in Europe during the first troubled months of postwar adjustment and reconstruction. Upon her return to the United States 21 June 1920, the ship took part in Neutrality Patrol duty on the East Coast and engaged in fleet exercises before her decommissioning at Philadelphia 18 January 1923.

Talbott recommissioned 1 May 1930, Lieutenant C. H. Cobb in command, and immediately began shakedown training in Delaware Bay. For the 10 years that followed, the ship operated along the Atlantic coast and in the Caribbean engaging in antisubmarine training fleet operations and carrying out the many far-ranging duties of the United States fleet. She also helped to train reserves and midshipmen.

With the outbreak of the war in Europe, and America's initial effort to protect its shipping while remaining neutral, Talbott was assigned patrol duties in the waters off the Atlantic entrance to the Panama Canal. Following America's entry into the war with the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, the ship took up convoy escort duties between New Orleans, Cuba, and the Canal, helping to protect the sea lanes and to move the vast amounts of men and materiel needed for victory.

Following an overhaul in Boston in January 1944, Talbott sailed 13 February with her first transatlantic convoy, and, after her safe return from Casablanca, took up escort duties with convoys from Iceland southward into the Caribbean. Later in the year, after arrival 15 September, she was converted at New York and reclassified AG-81 25 September 1944. The ship arrived Port Everglades, Florida, 1 November to act as a target ship for torpedo bombers, continuing this important training service until the war's end.

Talbott was decommissioned at Boston on 21 May 1946, stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on 19 June 1946 and sold for scrap to the Boston Metals Corporation of Baltimore in Maryland on 22 December 1946.


J. Fred Talbott departed Newport, Rhode Island on 10 July for the Mediterranean Sea, where she acted as a station ship at various ports acting as US representation during reconstruction. Upon her return to the United States on 21 June 1920, the ship took part in Neutrality Patrol duty on the East Coast and engaged in fleet exercises before her decommissioning at Philadelphia on 18 January 1923.

J. Fred Talbott recommissioned 1 May 1930, Lieutenant C. H. Cobb in command, and immediately began shakedown training in Delaware Bay. For the ten years that followed, the ship operated along the Atlantic coast and in the Caribbean Sea engaging in anti-submarine training fleet operations and carrying out the many far-ranging duties of the United States fleet. She also helped to train reserves and midshipmen.

With the outbreak of the war in Europe, and the United States' initial effort to protect its shipping while remaining neutral, J. Fred Talbott was assigned patrol duties in the waters off the Atlantic entrance to the Panama Canal. Following the US entry into the war with the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, the ship took up convoy escort duties between New Orleans, Cuba, and the Panama Canal.

Following an overhaul in Boston in January 1944, J. Fred Talbott sailed on 13 February with her first transatlantic convoy, and, after her safe return from Casablanca, took up escort duties with convoys from Iceland southward into the Caribbean. Later in the year, after arrival on 15 September, she was converted at New York and reclassified AG-81 on 25 September 1944. The ship arrived Port Everglades, Florida, 1 November to act as a target ship for torpedo bombers, continuing this training service until the war's end.

J. Fred Talbott was decommissioned at Boston on 21 May 1946, stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on 19 June 1946 and sold for scrap to the Boston Metals Corporation of Baltimore, Maryland on 22 December 1946.


USS J. Fred Talbott (DD 156)

Decommissioned 18 January 1923
Recommissioned 1 May 1930
Reclassified as auxiliary AG-81 on 25 September 1944
Decommissioned 21 May 1946
Stricken 19 June 1946
Sold 22 December 1946 and broken up for scrap.

Commands listed for USS J. Fred Talbott (DD 156)

Please note that we're still working on this section.

CommanderFromTo
1Clarence Henry Pike, USN mid 1940
2Lt.Cdr. Clyde Marcus Jensen, USNmid 1940mid 1942
3Lt.Cdr. Frederic Seward Keeler, USNmid 19425 May 1943
4T/Cdr. William Weldon Stark, Jr., USN5 May 194328 Dec 1943
5Lt Charles Harris Hutchins, USNR28 Dec 194312 Oct 1944
6P B Brown, USNR12 Oct 19447 Jan 1946

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Media links


J. Fred Talbott được đặt lườn vào ngày 8 tháng 7 năm 1918 tại xưởng tàu của hãng William Cramp & Sons ở Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Nó được hạ thủy vào ngày 14 tháng 12 năm 1918, được đỡ đầu bởi bà Robert L. Bates, cháu gái Dân biểu Talbott, và được đưa ra hoạt động vào ngày 30 tháng 6 năm 1919 dưới quyền chỉ huy của Hạm trưởng, Trung tá Hải quân T. G. Ellyson.

J. Fred Talbott khởi hành từ Newport, Rhode Island vào ngày 10 tháng 7 năm 1919 để đi sang Địa Trung Hải, nơi nó hoạt động như một tàu căn cứ tại nhiều cảng, góp phần làm bình ổn tình hình tại Châu Âu trong những tháng đầu tiên sau chiến tranh đang điều chỉnh và tái thiết. Sau khi quay trở về Hoa Kỳ vào ngày 21 tháng 6 năm 1920, nó tham gia tuần tra tại vùng bờ Đông và các cuộc tập trận hạm đội cho đến khi được cho xuất biên chế tại Philadelphia vào ngày 18 tháng 1 năm 1923.

J. Fred Talbott được cho nhập biên chế trở lại vào ngày 1 tháng 5 năm 1930 dưới quyền chỉ huy của Hạm trưởng, Trung úy Hải quân C. H. Cobb, và bắt đầu chạy thử máy huấn luyện trong vịnh Delaware. Trong mười năm tiếp theo, nó hoạt động dọc theo bờ biển Đại Tây Dương và vùng biển Caribe, tham gia các cuộc huấn luyện chống tàu ngầm, tập trận hạm đội cùng nhiều nhiệm vụ đa dạng khác. Nó cũng giúp vào việc huấn luyện quân nhân dự bị và học viên sĩ quan.

Khi Chiến tranh Thế giới thứ hai nổ ra tại châu Âu, các nỗ lực ban đầu của Hoa Kỳ tập trung vào việc bảo vệ tàu bè của mình trong khi vẫn giữ vị thế trung lập. J. Fred Talbott được phân công nhiệm vụ Tuần tra Trung lập tại vùng biển tiếp cận lối ra vào kênh đào Panama bên phía Đại Tây Dương. Sau khi cuộc tấn công bất ngờ vào Trân Châu Cảng đẩy Hoa Kỳ vào chiến tranh, nó làm nhiệm vụ hộ tống đoàn tàu vận tải đi lại giữa New Orleans, Cuba và vùng kênh đào, bảo vệ các tuyến đường hàng hải và vận chuyển các nguồn lực cần thiết cho chiến tranh.

Sau khi được đại tu tại Boston vào tháng 1 năm 1944, J. Fred Talbott khởi hành vào ngày 13 tháng 2 cho chuyến vượt đại dương đầu tiên, và sau khi đến được Casablanca an toàn, nó quay trở lại nhiệm vụ hộ tống các đoàn tàu trong khu vực từ Iceland trải về phía Nam đến tận vùng biển Caribe. Quay trở về New York vào ngày 15 tháng 9, nó được cải biến thành một tàu phụ trợ, rồi được xếp lại lớp với ký hiệu lườn AG-81 vào ngày 25 tháng 9 năm 1944. Nó đi đến Port Everglades, Florida vào ngày 1 tháng 11 để hoạt động như một tàu mục tiêu huấn luyện cho máy bay ném bom-ngư lôi, tiếp tục vai trò quan trọng này cho đến khi chiến tranh kết thúc. J. Fred Talbott được cho ngừng hoạt động tại Boston vào ngày 21 tháng 5 năm 1946. Tên nó được cho rút khỏi danh sách Đăng bạ Hải quân vào ngày 19 tháng 6 năm 1946, và nó bị bán cho hãng Boston Metals Corporation ở Baltimore, Maryland vào ngày 22 tháng 12 năm 1946 để tháo dỡ.


Service history [ edit | edit source ]

J. Fred Talbott departed Newport, Rhode Island 10 July for the Mediterranean, where she acted as a station ship at various ports providing an element of stability in Europe during the first troubled months of postwar adjustment and reconstruction. Upon her return to the United States 21 June 1920, the ship took part in Neutrality Patrol duty on the East Coast and engaged in fleet exercises before decommissioning at Philadelphia 18 January 1923.

Talbott recommissioned 1 May 1930, Lieutenant C. H. Cobb in command, and immediately began shakedown training in Delaware Bay. For the 10 years that followed, the ship operated along the Atlantic coast and in the Caribbean engaging in antisubmarine training fleet operations and carrying out the many far-ranging duties of the United States fleet. She also helped to train reserves and midshipmen.

With the outbreak of the war in Europe, and America's initial effort to protect its shipping while remaining neutral, Talbott was assigned patrol duties in the waters off the Atlantic entrance to the Panama Canal. Following America's entry into the war with the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, the ship took up convoy escort duties between New Orleans, Cuba, and the Canal, helping to protect the sea lanes and to move the vast amounts of men and materiel needed for victory.

Following an overhaul in Boston in January 1944, Talbott sailed 13 February with her first transatlantic convoy, and, after her safe return from Casablanca, took up escort duties with convoys from Iceland southward into the Caribbean. Later in the year, after arrival 15 September, she was converted at New York and reclassified AG-81 25 September 1944. The ship arrived Port Everglades, Florida, 1 November to act as a target ship for torpedo bombers, continuing this important training service until the war's end.

Talbott was decommissioned at Boston on 21 May 1946, stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on 19 June 1946 and sold for scrap to the Boston Metals Corporation of Baltimore in Maryland on 22 December 1946.


J FRED TALBOTT AG 81

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.

    Wickes Class Destroyer
    Keel Laid July 8 1918 - Launched December 14 1918

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USS Tattnall (DD-125/ APD-19)

USS Tattnall (DD-125/ APD-19) was a Wickes class destroyer that entered service just to late for the First World War, but that served as a convoy escort and then a fast transport during the Second World War.

The Tattnall was named after Josiah Tattnal, a US Naval officer who fought in the War of 1812 and the Mexican War, but who then chose to serve in the Confederate Navy during the American Civil War.

The Tattnall was laid down on 1 December 1917 at Camden, New Jersey, launched on 5 September 1918 and commissioned on 26 June 1919. After her trials she was allocated to the forces operating in the Mediterranean, reaching Constantinople on 27 July 1919. She spent the next year based in Turkish waters, although she also visited Egypt, Greece, Russia and Syria. During this period one of her roles was to act as a passenger and mail ship.

The Tattnall returned to the United States in June-July 1920. She then joined the Pacific Fleet, reaching her new base at San Diego on 17 December 1920. She served on the Californian coast until she was decommissioned on 15 June 1922.

The Tattnall was recommissioned for the first time on 1 May 1930, and joined the Battle Force, operating on the West Coast. At the end of Fleet Problem XII in March 1931 the Tattnall was one of nine destroyers that were transferred from the Battle Fleet to the Scouting Fleet (Scouting Force 1 from 1 April 1931). She joined Destroyer Division 7, part of Destroyer Squadron 3, Destroyer Flotilla 1, Scouting Force 1. Most of April and early May was spent in exercises off Guantanamo Bay, before the division moved to its new base on the US East Coast.

In 1932 the Tattnall joined the rotating reserve. On 1 January 1934 she moved to the Scouting Force Training Squadron, where she remained for the next year. Most of 1935 was spent back in the rotating reserve, before she rejoined the Training Squadron towards the end of the year. She was still with this unit when he became part of the Training Detachment, United States Fleet.

On 17 November 1938 the Tattnall and the J. Fred Talbot (DD-186) replaced the Dallas (DD-199) and Babbitt (DD-128) as part of the Special Service Squadron, based in the Panama Canal Zone. The Tattnall was part of this unit until it was disbanded on 17 September 1940, but she remained based at Panama after that date, operating in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean.

In June 1941 she helped escort part of a US Marine expeditionary force from the Panama Canal to the US East Coast. This force had been raised with the occupation of Martinique in mind, but in the end was used to replace the British garrison of Iceland.

After the US entry into the Second World War the Tattnall found herself operating in an active war zone, as the U-boats attacked shipping off the US Coast and in the Caribbean. She was used to escort coastal convoys and made many passages through the Windward Passage between Cuba and Hispaniola, a key hunting ground for the U-boats. During 1942 and the first half of 1943 she carried out a series of attacks on possible targets, but without any recorded successes.

The Tattnall reached Charleston with her last convoy on 10 July, and work then began on converting her into a fast transport. She was redesignated as APD-19 on 24 July, and the conversion was completed on 6 September. She had a short shake-down cruiser in mid-September, and then began a period of training in amphibious warfare.

In April 1944 the Tattnall was made flagship of Transport Division 13, based in the Atlantic. She was sent to the Mediterranean theatre along with USS Roper (APD-20), USS Barry (APD-29), USS Greene (APD-36) and USS Osmond Ingram (APD-35). She joined the 8th Fleet in late April 1944, and began to prepare for an invasion of Elba and Pianosa. During this period she was used in a deception operation, feigning a landing near Civitavecchia, north of Rome. The Germans apparently fell for this ruse, announcing the invasion, and probably diverting troops to that area.

The invasion of Elbe and Pianosa took place on 17 June 1944. The Tattnall landed her troops by boats which came under machine gun fire, but landed without suffering serious damage.

The Tattnall then spent a short period escorting convoys between Italy, Sicily and North Africa, before preparing for the invasion of the south of France. On 15 August she helped land 1,600 troops from the Canadian 1st Special Service Force on the Hyeres Islands, east of Toulon. The islands were secured in three days. The Tattnall was then used to bring reinforcements and supplies to France and evacuate casualties and the increasing number of prisoners of war. She then spent the rest of 1944 escorting convoys in the Mediterranean, before returning to the United States late in the year,

On 31 January 1945 the Tattnall left Hampton Roads, heading for the Pacific. She reached Okinawa on 19 April, and was used to form part of the anti-kamikaze screen around the American fleet. On the night of 29-30 April she claimed one twin engined aircraft, which was brought down so close to her that debris actually pierced her hull above the waterline.

After this drama the Tattnall departed to the Mariana Islands, arriving on 3 May. She escorted a convoy back to Okinawa, which arrived on 20 May. She then rejoined the defensive screen, but this time without coming under attack.

In June the Tattnall was moved to the Philippines, and she spent the rest of the war patrolling around the Philippines and escorting convoys to Ulithi and Hollandia.

After the war the Tattnall departed for the United States on 13 September, arriving at San Francisco on 30 October. She was decommissioned at Puget Sound on 17 December 1945, struck off on 8 January 1946 and sold for scrap on 17 October 1946.

The Tattnall earned three battle stars during the Second World War, for operations off the west coast of Italy in 1944, the invasion of Southern France and Okinawa.


Watch the video: JMSDF destroyer Setogiri DD 156 operates alongside aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower