10 Fascinating Facts About Charles Lindbergh

10 Fascinating Facts About Charles Lindbergh

1. His father was a U.S. Congressman.

When Lindbergh was four years old, Minnesota’s Sixth Congressional District elected his father, Charles August Lindbergh, to the U.S. House of Representatives. The elder Lindbergh would serve five terms in Congress, where he won a reputation for his independent stances and fierce opposition to the Federal Reserve System. Congressman Lindbergh was among the few members of the House to speak out against U.S. involvement in World War I, and was later censored and accused of sedition after writing an anti-war pamphlet called “Why is Your Country at War?”

2. He worked as a daredevil and stunt pilot.

After learning to fly at the Nebraska Aircraft Corporation in Lincoln, Lindbergh spent two years years as an itinerant stuntman and aerial daredevil. During “barnstorming” excursions through the American heartland, the young aviator wowed audiences with daring displays of wing-walking, parachuting and mid-air plane changes. After purchasing his own plane, he became one of the nation’s top stunt pilots, often twisting his machine into complicated loops and spins or killing the engine at 3,000 feet and gliding to ground. Despite the hazardous nature of stunt flying, “Lucky Lindy’s” closest brushes with death would come during his time as a U.S. Army flier, test pilot and airmail pilot, when he survived a record four plane crashes by bailing out and parachuting to safety.

3. He wasn’t the first person to make a transatlantic crossing in an airplane.

In the years before Charles Lindbergh’s New York to Paris flight, dozens of other pioneering aviators completed airborne crossings of the Atlantic. Most made the journey in multiple stages or used lighter-than-air dirigibles, but in 1919, British pilots John Alcock and Arthur Brown famously flew nonstop from Newfoundland to Ireland in a Vickers Vimy biplane before crash landing in a bog. Lindbergh’s major achievement was not that he was the first person to cross the Atlantic by airplane, but rather that he did it alone and between two major international cities.

4. He experienced hallucinations and saw mirages during his famous flight.

Along with the perils of navigating the foggy Atlantic, Lindbergh’s biggest challenge during his transatlantic flight was simply staying awake. Between his pre-flight preparations and the 33.5-hour journey itself, he went some 55 hours without sleep. Lindbergh went so far as to buzz the surface of the ocean in the hope that the chilly sea spray would help keep him awake, but 24 hours into the journey, he became delirious from lack of rest. He later wrote of mirage-like “fog islands” forming in the sea below, and of seeing “vaguely outlined forms, transparent, moving, riding weightless with me in the plane.” Lindbergh even claimed the apparitions spoke to him and offered words of wisdom for his journey. The hallucinations eventually faded, and only a few hours later, the exhausted aviator landed in Paris to a crowd of more than 150,000 jubilant spectators.

5. He achieved several more “firsts” in aviation.

Lindbergh’s transcontinental crossing made him one of the most famous men in the world. He received millions of letters from adoring fans, rode in more than a thousand miles of parades and was even given the Medal of Honor. Still, it wasn’t long before the “The Lone Eagle” took back to the skies on another ambitious journey. In December 1927, he piloted “The Spirit of St. Louis” on a solo, non-stop flight from Washington D.C. to Mexico City as part of a goodwill tour of Latin America. While in Mexico, Lindbergh met Anne Morrow, the daughter of U.S. Ambassador Dwight Morrow, and the two married only a few months later. Anne later became Lindbergh’s trusted copilot and radio operator, and the couple made several groundbreaking flights, including a 1931 trip from the United States to Japan and China.

6. Gangster Al Capone offered to help find Lindbergh’s kidnapped baby.

On March 1, 1932, Lindbergh’s 20-month-old son, Charles Lindbergh, Jr., was mysteriously kidnapped from his home in New Jersey. The family received thousands of offers of assistance, including one from none other than “Scarface” himself—Al Capone. While waiting to be transferred to prison on charges of tax evasion, Capone released a statement offering the Lindberghs his condolences, saying, “I know how Mrs. Capone and I would feel if our son were kidnapped.” The gangster put up a $10,000 reward for information that would lead to the arrest of the perpetrators, and even proposed to use his criminal connections to help find the kidnappers in exchange for his release from jail. Lindbergh didn’t accept the offer, but he did work with other underworld figures who claimed they had information on the crime. The search would ultimately end in tragedy in May 1932, when the body of the murdered Lindbergh baby was found only a few miles from the family home.

7. He played a role in the advent of the space program.

Lindbergh was a famous proponent of early air travel, but he also helped sow the seeds of the space program through his work with Robert Goddard, the so-called “father of modern rocketry.” Lindbergh first learned about Goddard’s experiments with liquid-fueled rockets in late-1929, and the two soon struck up a lifelong friendship. Convinced that Goddard’s work might one day facilitate a trip to the moon, Lindbergh became the physicist’s greatest champion and even persuaded philanthropist Daniel Guggenheim to give him $100,000 in funding. Goddard’s breakthroughs would later prove invaluable in the development of early missiles and space travel. When Apollo 8 became the first manned space mission to orbit the moon in 1968, Lindbergh sent the astronauts a message saying, “You have turned into reality the dream of Robert Goddard.”

8. He helped invent an early artificial heart.

Lindbergh was known for his hands-on approach to repairing and prepping his aircraft, and he later turned his mechanical wizardry toward biology. Inspired by his sister-in-law Elisabeth’s battle with heart disease, he teamed with Nobel Prize-winning French surgeon Alexis Carrel and spent much of the early 1930s working on a method for keeping organs alive outside the body. By 1935, Lindbergh had developed a perfusion pump made of Pyrex glass that was capable of moving air and life-giving fluids through excised organs to keep them working and infection-free. The pump was hailed as a medical breakthrough, and helped pave the way for the development of the first true artificial organs. Lindbergh and Carrel later collaborated on a 1938 book on the subject called “The Culture of Organs.”

9. He was a major opponent of U.S. involvement in WWII.

In the late-1930s and early 1940s, Lindbergh’s ironclad reputation took a serious hit for his opposition to World War II and his apparent fascination with Nazi Germany. The aviator had made several trips to Germany in the 1930s to inspect its air force, and returned home convinced that the Luftwaffe was capable of overpowering the rest of Europe. He became one of the most vocal opponents of American involvement in the conflict, and gave dozens of public speeches and radio addresses criticizing President Franklin Roosevelt and Jewish-run newspapers and arguing in favor of isolationism. As the United States edged closer to war, many began to denounce the former hero as an anti-Semite and a traitor. Lindbergh gave up his crusade and tried to win a commission in the military after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, but President Roosevelt—who privately called the aviator a Nazi—barred him from serving. Lindbergh later spent time as a test pilot and aviation advisor before travelling to the war’s Pacific Theater as an observer. Though officially a civilian, he eventually flew around 50 combat missions and even shot down a Japanese fighter plane.

10. He was a staunch conservationist.

Lindbergh traveled widely after World War II, and later claimed that his wanderings had made him acutely aware of the toll modern civilization was taking on animal and plant life. Arguing that he would rather have “birds than airplanes,” in the 1960s, Lindbergh threw his support behind the World Wildlife Fund and the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources. He used his travels to lobby for environmental causes, and fought against the disappearance of dozens of endangered species including blue and humpback whales, tortoises, tamaraws and eagles. Before his death in 1974, he also lived among indigenous tribes in Africa and the Philippines and helped procure land for the formation of Haleakala National Park in Hawaii.


Charles Lindbergh

Summary of the Charles Lindbergh and the first Transatlantic Flight
Summary: Charles Lindbergh (1902-1974) was an American aviator and one of the most famous figures in aeronautical history. Charles Lindbergh became an early aviation hero when he completed the first nonstop solo flight across the Atlantic Ocean, from New York City to Paris, in May 1927 in the Ryan airplane that was named the Spirit of St. Louis. The aircraft was custom-built to compete for the $25,000 Orteig Prize for the first non-stop flight between New York and Paris. Charles Lindbergh successfully completed the solo flight in 33 hours and 30 minutes. Lindbergh's New York-to-Paris flight made him an instant worldwide celebrity. When Charles Lindbergh returned to the United States he was presented him with the Distinguished Flying Cross by President Calvin Coolidge.

Charles Lindbergh and the first Transatlantic Flight
Calvin Coolidge was the 30th American President who served in office from August 2, 1923 to March 4, 1929. One of the important events during his presidency was the Charles Lindbergh first Transatlantic Flight in the Spirit of St. Louis .

Charles Lindbergh and the Spirit of St. Louis

Charles Lindbergh Facts for kids: Fast Fact Sheet
Fast, fun facts and Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ's) about Charles Lindbergh.

What is Charles Lindbergh famous for? Charles Lindbergh is famous for making the first solo, non-stop flight across the Atlantic Ocean on May 20-21, 1927. He made the Transatlantic Flight in the airplane called the Spirit of St. Louis .

When did Charles Lindbergh die? Charles Lindbergh died on August 26, 1974 in Kipahulu, Hawaii, United States.

Where is Charles Lindbergh buried? Charles Lindbergh is buried at Palapala Ho'omau Church Cemetery, Kipahulu, Hawaii

Spirit of St. Louis Facts for kids
Fast, fun facts about the Spirit of St. Louis:

● The Spirit of St. Louis was made by Ryan Airlines and designed by Donald A. Hall
● The Spirit of St. Louis was a custom-built, single engine, single-seat monoplane
● The airplane was named in recognition of Lindbergh's supporters from the St. Louis Raquette Club in St. Louis, Missouri.
● The cost of the Spirit of St. Louis was $10,580 and it was built in just 60 days

Charles Lindbergh Facts for kids
The following fact sheet contains interesting facts and information on Charles Lindbergh and the first Transatlantic Flight for kids.

30 Facts about the Charles Lindbergh and the first Transatlantic Flight for kids

Charles Lindbergh Fact 1: Charles Lindbergh was born on February 4, 1902 in Detroit , Michigan , U.S. and was the only child of Charles August Lindbergh and Evangeline Lodge Land Lindbergh.

Charles Lindbergh Fact 2: His father, Charles August Lindbergh was a congressman from Minnesota from 1907 to 1917.

Charles Lindbergh Fact 3: Charles was a loner and made few friends attending schools in in Little Falls, Minnesota, and Washington, D.C.,

Charles Lindbergh Fact 4: He attended the University of Wisconsin in Madison, but was unable to settle and left after two years. He had developed a passionate interest in aviation and decided that he wanted to become a pilot.

Charles Lindbergh Fact 5: He enrolled at a flying school in Lincoln , Nebraska, and became a talented pilot with superb reflexes and was able to fly under pressure.

Charles Lindbergh Fact 6: During World War One the U.S Army had used Curtiss JN-4HM "Jenny" biplanes. After WW1 the U.S. government sold off the surplus Jennys, for a fraction of their initial cost. This enabled pilots to purchase JN-4s (Jennys) for as little as $200. Charles Lindbergh purchased his own plane.

Charles Lindbergh Fact 7: Like many of the early aviators Charles Lindbergh set up business as a Barnstormer and became a daring stunt pilot thrilling the crowds with his daring aerobatic maneuvers and death-defying stunts.

Charles Lindbergh Fact 8: He wanted to perfect his flying techniques and enlisted in Army flying school. From the group of 104 flying cadets, he graduated first in his class.

Charles Lindbergh Fact 9: In 1925 when the Kelly Act was passed that authorized postal officials to contract with private airplane operators to carry U.S. Air Mail.

Charles Lindbergh Fact 10: Lieutenant Charles A. Lindbergh moved to St. Louis where he was appointed to the prestigious role of Chief Airmail Pilot for Robertson Aircraft.

30 Facts about the Charles Lindbergh and the first Transatlantic Flight for kids

Facts about the Charles Lindbergh for kids
The following fact sheet continues with facts about Charles Lindbergh and the first Transatlantic Flight for kids.

30 Facts about the Charles Lindbergh and the first Transatlantic Flight for kids

Charles Lindbergh Fact 11: Charles Lindbergh still wasn't satisfied and wanted a new challenge. He wanted to win the Orteig Prize, a $25,000 reward offered by New York hotel owner Raymond Orteig to the first aviator to fly non-stop from New York City to Paris

Charles Lindbergh Fact 12: Other aviators had the same idea including Rene Fonck, Clarence Chamberlin, Noel Davis, and Richard Byrd who were considered the greatest flyers of the day.

Charles Lindbergh Fact 13: Charles Lindbergh contacted influential people in St. Louis who had an interest in flying and promoting aviation who might be interested in becoming sponsors.

Charles Lindbergh Fact 14: Earl Thompson, Major Albert Bond Lambert, Harry Hall Knight and Harold Bixby believed that a successful flight could put St. Louis on the aviation map and agreed, with some other backers, to provide financial backing for the plan. The sponsors formed the Spirit of St. Louis Organization

Charles Lindbergh Fact 15: Charles Lindbergh failed to obtain an aeroplane from several large airline companies but eventually in 1927 he received an offer from Ryan Airlines, a relatively unknown company in San Diego.

Charles Lindbergh Fact 16: Donald Hall, the design engineer at Ryan, together with Charles Lindbergh worked tirelessly with the team at Ryan Airlines to build the Spirit of St. Louis biplane.

Charles Lindbergh Fact 17: The Spirit of St. Louis was custom-built to fit Charles Lindbergh in just 60 days and cost $10,580. It was a single engine, single-seat monoplane designed for flying solo.

Charles Lindbergh Fact 18: Fuel capacity was their major priority, so much so that the biplane was nicknamed "the flying gas tank". April 28, 1927 the Spirit of St. Louis was ready for its first test and it functioned perfectly.

Charles Lindbergh Fact 19: He flew the plane to New York and was greeted by a media frenzy surrounding all the competitors who had entered the flying race.

Charles Lindbergh Fact 20: Charles Lindbergh and the Spirit of St. Louis left Roosevelt Field 7:30am on May 20, 1927. He was flying solo, completely alone in the terrifying journey that was ahead of him.

Charles Lindbergh Fact 21: Flight Plan: The flight plan from New York initially followed Long Island, New England, over the Atlantic to Nova Scotia, then over the Atlantic again over Placentia Bay to Newfoundland.

Charles Lindbergh Fact 22: From Newfoundland Charles Lindbergh faced flying solo in the darkness and icy winds for 15 hours over the Atlantic Ocean.

Charles Lindbergh Fact 23: A magnetic storm played havoc with his compass and he became extremely disorientated. He then spotted a seagull and a small fishing boat and knew that he would soon sight the coast of Ireland.

Charles Lindbergh Fact 24: He passed Dingle Bay in Ireland and headed on to Paris. After thirty-four hours flying solo he landed at Le Bourget field near Paris on the night of May 21, 1927

Charles Lindbergh Fact 25: Charles Lindbergh was greeted by a cheering crowd, it was the start of the type of reception he would get wherever he went - Lindbergh's New York-to-Paris solo flight had made him a worldwide celebrity.

Charles Lindbergh Fact 26: On his return to the United States he was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross by President Calvin Coolidge.

Charles Lindbergh Fact 27: He married Anne Morrow, the daughter of Dwight Morrow, the U.S. ambassador to Mexico in May 1929 and they had a son on June 22, 1930.

Charles Lindbergh Fact 28: Sadly, Charles Lindbergh's happy life was devastated when his two-year-old son, Charles Augustus, Jr., was kidnapped from his home near Hopewell, New Jersey, and a short time later was found murdered on March 2, 1932.

Charles Lindbergh Fact 29: Anne and Charles went on to have another four children following WW2.

Charles Lindbergh Fact 30: Charles Lindberg went on to write several books about his life, including The Spirit of St. Louis (1953), describing his solo flight to Paris which gained him gained him a Pulitzer Prize.

Facts about Charles Lindbergh and the first Transatlantic Flight :
For visitors interested in the history of aviation refer to the following articles:

Charles Lindbergh for kids - President Calvin Coolidge Video
The article on the Charles Lindbergh provides detailed facts and a summary of one of the important events during his presidential term in office. The following Calvin Coolidge video will give you additional important facts and dates about the political events experienced by the 30th American President whose presidency spanned from August 2, 1923 to March 4, 1929.

Charles Lindbergh and the first Transatlantic Flight

● Interesting Facts about Charles Lindbergh for kids and schools
● Summary of the Charles Lindbergh and the first Transatlantic Flight
● Charles Lindbergh of important, key events
● Calvin Coolidge Presidency from August 2, 1923 to March 4, 1929
● Fast, fun facts about the Charles Lindbergh
● Charles Lindbergh and the first Transatlantic Flight
● Calvin Coolidge Presidency and Charles Lindbergh and the first Transatlantic Flightfor schools, homework, kids and children

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First Man to Fly the Atlantic Solo – 10 Fascinating Facts About Charles Lindbergh

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Charles A. Lindbergh (1902-1974) was an American aviator, military officer, author, inventor, explorer, and environmental activist. Famed for his Orteig Prize-winning solo non-stop flight on May 20&ndash21, 1927 at the age of 25, from Roosevelt Field located in Garden City on New York’s Long Island to Le Bourget Field in Paris, France, a distance of nearly 3,600 statute miles, in the single-seat, single-engine monoplane Spirit of St. Louis.

Charles Lindbergh in the open cockpit of airplane at Lambert Field, St. Louis, Missouri in 1923

The 33.5-hour crossing vaulted Lindbergh to international stardom, but he was later visited by tragedy in 1932, when his 20-month-old son was kidnapped and murdered in what was dubbed &ldquothe Crime of the Century.&rdquo

Below, 10 surprising facts about the heroic and controversial life of the aviator known as &ldquoThe Lone Eagle.&rdquo

1. His father was a U.S. Congressman.

When Lindbergh was four years old, Minnesota&rsquos Sixth Congressional District elected his father, Charles August Lindbergh, to the U.S. House of Representatives. The elder Lindbergh would serve five terms in Congress, where he won a reputation for his independent stances and fierce opposition to the Federal Reserve System. Congressman Lindbergh was among the few members of the House to speak out against U.S. involvement in World War I, and was later censored and accused of sedition after writing an anti-war pamphlet called &ldquoWhy is Your Country at War?&rdquo

Charles Lindbergh and father, Charles. A. Lindbergh. 1909

Aviator Charles Lindbergh and his mother in 1930

Charles Lindbergh and Anne Spencer Morrow were married on May 27, 1929

2. He worked as a daredevil and stunt pilot.

After learning to fly at the Nebraska Aircraft Corporation in Lincoln, Lindbergh spent two years years as an itinerant stuntman and aerial daredevil. During &ldquobarnstorming&rdquo excursions through the American heartland, the young aviator wowed audiences with daring displays of wing-walking, parachuting and mid-air plane changes. After purchasing his own plane, he became one of the nation&rsquos top stunt pilots, often twisting his machine into complicated loops and spins or killing the engine at 3,000 feet and gliding to ground. Despite the hazardous nature of stunt flying, &ldquoLucky Lindy&rsquos&rdquo closest brushes with death would come during his time as a U.S. Army flier, test pilot and airmail pilot, when he survived a record four plane crashes by bailing out and parachuting to safety.

Portrait of young Charles Lindbergh

3. He wasn&rsquot the first person to make a transatlantic crossing in an airplane.

In the years before Charles Lindbergh&rsquos New York to Paris flight, dozens of other pioneering aviators completed airborne crossings of the Atlantic. Most made the journey in multiple stages or used lighter-than-air dirigibles, but in 1919, British pilots John Alcock and Arthur Brown famously flew nonstop from Newfoundland to Ireland in a Vickers Vimy biplane before crash landing in a bog. Lindbergh&rsquos major achievement was not that he was the first person to cross the Atlantic by airplane, but rather that he did it alone and between two major international cities.

Charles Lindbergh became the first man to fly the Atlantic solo on May 21, 1927

Charles Lindbergh in Roosevelt Field, NY on May 20, 1927

Lindbergh poses with Spirit behind, circa 1927

4. He experienced hallucinations and saw mirages during his famous flight.

Along with the perils of navigating the foggy Atlantic, Lindbergh&rsquos biggest challenge during his transatlantic flight was simply staying awake. Between his pre-flight preparations and the 33.5-hour journey itself, he went some 55 hours without sleep. Lindbergh went so far as to buzz the surface of the ocean in the hope that the chilly sea spray would help keep him awake, but 24 hours into the journey, he became delirious from lack of rest. He later wrote of mirage-like &ldquofog islands&rdquo forming in the sea below, and of seeing &ldquovaguely outlined forms, transparent, moving, riding weightless with me in the plane.&rdquo Lindbergh even claimed the apparitions spoke to him and offered words of wisdom for his journey. The hallucinations eventually faded, and only a few hours later, the exhausted aviator landed in Paris to a crowd of more than 150,000 jubilant spectators.

Pulling the propeller on the Spirit

Charles Lindbergh with his famed Spirit of St. Louis plane, circa 1927

5. He achieved several more &ldquofirsts&rdquo in aviation.

Lindbergh&rsquos transcontinental crossing made him one of the most famous men in the world. He received millions of letters from adoring fans, rode in more than a thousand miles of parades and was even given the Medal of Honor. Still, it wasn&rsquot long before the &ldquoThe Lone Eagle&rdquo took back to the skies on another ambitious journey. In December 1927, he piloted &ldquoThe Spirit of St. Louis&rdquo on a solo, non-stop flight from Washington D.C. to Mexico City as part of a goodwill tour of Latin America. While in Mexico, Lindbergh met Anne Morrow, the daughter of U.S. Ambassador Dwight Morrow, and the two married only a few months later. Anne later became Lindbergh&rsquos trusted copilot and radio operator, and the couple made several groundbreaking flights, including a 1931 trip from the United States to Japan and China.

Charles Lindbergh, circa 1927

Charles Lindbergh in a Boeing F3B-1, BuNo A-7739, VB-2B, USS Saratoga, February 1929

6. Gangster Al Capone offered to help find Lindbergh&rsquos kidnapped baby.

On March 1, 1932, Lindbergh&rsquos 20-month-old son, Charles Lindbergh, Jr., was mysteriously kidnapped from his home in New Jersey. The family received thousands of offers of assistance, including one from none other than &ldquoScarface&rdquo himself&mdashAl Capone. While waiting to be transferred to prison on charges of tax evasion, Capone released a statement offering the Lindberghs his condolences, saying, &ldquoI know how Mrs. Capone and I would feel if our son were kidnapped.&rdquo The gangster put up a $10,000 reward for information that would lead to the arrest of the perpetrators, and even proposed to use his criminal connections to help find the kidnappers in exchange for his release from jail. Lindbergh didn&rsquot accept the offer, but he did work with other underworld figures who claimed they had information on the crime. The search would ultimately end in tragedy in May 1932, when the body of the murdered Lindbergh baby was found only a few miles from the family home.

Charles Lindbergh junior before he was kidnapped and murdered by Bruno Hauptmann in 1932

The ‘Lindbergh Baby’ kidnapping was one of the most sensational and widely publicized crimes of the 20th century

A series of ransom notes following the kidnapping led to a meeting between Dr. John Condon, a representative of the Lindbergh family, and a mysterious man named &ldquoJohn.&rdquo An artist sketch of &ldquoJohn&rdquo was developed from the verbal description of Dr. Condon and proved to be very similar to Bruno Richard Hauptmann (right), who was arrested on September 19, 1934

7. He played a role in the advent of the space program.

Lindbergh was a famous proponent of early air travel, but he also helped sow the seeds of the space program through his work with Robert Goddard, the so-called &ldquofather of modern rocketry.&rdquo Lindbergh first learned about Goddard&rsquos experiments with liquid-fueled rockets in late-1929, and the two soon struck up a lifelong friendship. Convinced that Goddard&rsquos work might one day facilitate a trip to the moon, Lindbergh became the physicist&rsquos greatest champion and even persuaded philanthropist Daniel Guggenheim to give him $100,000 in funding. Goddard&rsquos breakthroughs would later prove invaluable in the development of early missiles and space travel. When Apollo 8 became the first manned space mission to orbit the moon in 1968, Lindbergh sent the astronauts a message saying, &ldquoYou have turned into reality the dream of Robert Goddard.&rdquo

Lindbergh and four workmen in front of Spirit

Charles Lindbergh with guests

8. He helped invent an early artificial heart.

Lindbergh was known for his hands-on approach to repairing and prepping his aircraft, and he later turned his mechanical wizardry toward biology. Inspired by his sister-in-law Elisabeth&rsquos battle with heart disease, he teamed with Nobel Prize-winning French surgeon Alexis Carrel and spent much of the early 1930s working on a method for keeping organs alive outside the body. By 1935, Lindbergh had developed a perfusion pump made of Pyrex glass that was capable of moving air and life-giving fluids through excised organs to keep them working and infection-free. The pump was hailed as a medical breakthrough, and helped pave the way for the development of the first true artificial organs. Lindbergh and Carrel later collaborated on a 1938 book on the subject called &ldquoThe Culture of Organs.&rdquo

Lindbergh and Dwight Morrow, Atlantic City, NJ, May 5, 1930

Lindbergh, in one of the many parades in his honor, in Hartford, Connecticut

9. He was a major opponent of U.S. involvement in WWII.

In the late 1930s and early 1940s, Lindbergh&rsquos ironclad reputation took a serious hit for his opposition to World War II and his apparent fascination with Nazi Germany. The aviator had made several trips to Germany in the 1930s to inspect its air force, and returned home convinced that the Luftwaffe was capable of overpowering the rest of Europe. He became one of the most vocal opponents of American involvement in the conflict, and gave dozens of public speeches and radio addresses criticizing President Franklin Roosevelt and Jewish-run newspapers and arguing in favor of isolationism. As the United States edged closer to war, many began to denounce the former hero as an anti-Semite and a traitor. Lindbergh gave up his crusade and tried to win a commission in the military after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, but President Roosevelt&mdashwho privately called the aviator a Nazi&mdashbarred him from serving. Lindbergh later spent time as a test pilot and aviation advisor before travelling to the war&rsquos Pacific Theater as an observer. Though officially a civilian, he eventually flew around 50 combat missions and even shot down a Japanese fighter plane.

Governor Fuller pins medal on Lindberg at the State House

Lindbergh, Gov. Fuller and Mayor Nichols

10. He was a staunch conservationist.

Lindbergh traveled widely after World War II, and later claimed that his wanderings had made him acutely aware of the toll modern civilization was taking on animal and plant life. Arguing that he would rather have &ldquobirds than airplanes,&rdquo in the 1960s, Lindbergh threw his support behind the World Wildlife Fund and the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources. He used his travels to lobby for environmental causes, and fought against the disappearance of dozens of endangered species including blue and humpback whales, tortoises, tamaraws and eagles. Before his death in 1974, he also lived among indigenous tribes in Africa and the Philippines and helped procure land for the formation of Haleakala National Park in Hawaii.


10 Facts About Charles Lindbergh

Charles Lindbergh may be the best known pilot in history and is famous for his flight across the Atlantic Ocean. He had a very long career and was a very successful pilot for throughout his life.

1. Famous Solo Flight

Very few people had heard of Lindbergh before he made his transatlantic flight. He became the most famous pilot of his era for his solo flight from New York to Paris in his airplane the Spirit of St. Louis.

2. Developer of the Artificial Heart

There are many things that people don’t know about Charles Lindbergh. For example, it is said that he was one of the first people to suggest and develop an artificial heart.

3. Supportive Father

His father was a lawyer and U.S. Congressman and was very supportive of Charles in all of his efforts and undertakings.

4. Knack For Mechanics

Charles was a very intelligent boy and had a particular skill and knack for mechanics. He began attending the University of Wisconsin at the age of 18 to study engineering. As a boy, had a very keen mind and showed strength and talent with engineering . His father also showed support and encouragement of his skills when Charles showed that he was skilled with mechanics. Although he began college studying engineering, he only stayed at the University of Wisconsin for two years and then began attending the Lincoln Flight School in Nevada.

Charles got his start at the flight school in Nebraska and started flying daredevil stunts in planes at county fairs and carnivals. He did the stunt pilot gig for a few years and then moved on to something more commercial. His beginnings as a pilot were modest and he even flew a mail plane from St. Louis to Chicago in 1926. When Lindbergh enlisted in the U.S. Army, he took the advice of his father and was trained as an army air service reserve pilot.

6. Famous Flight

The transatlantic solo flight across the Atlantic began as a gamble among several different pilots. There was a $25,000 reward, offered by a New York City hotel owner, to any pilot who could cross the Atlantic non-stop and there were several other pilots who tried and were unsuccessful. Lindbergh’s famous flight took place in 1927 in the Spirit of St. Louis. The plane that he flew was a Wright Whirlwind Plane and it had no brakes. He made the famous trip in 33 hours: he left from Newark Field in New York and arrived in Paris the following day.

7. Nicknames

Charles Lindbergh received several nicknames after making his transatlantic flight. The press gave him most of his names referring to him as Lucky Lindy and even the Lone Eagle, among others. Deemed a hero worldwide, Lindbergh was stunned when several French women kissed him after he landed.

8. Monetary Awards

Lindbergh was offered money by several different organizations for the tremendous feat that he had accomplished, among them the Paris Aero Club offered to give him 150,000 francs which was the equivalent of $6,000 for his flight. He refused the award and asked that the money be given to the families of pilots who had died while they were flying.

9. Ambassador of Sorts

Charles Lindbergh became an ambassador of sorts for the United States and visited countries all over the world. He flew to several Latin American countries and helped chart flight paths that are still used today by commercial airlines. The U.S. government even suggested that he fly to Nazi Germany to meet with officials there. He was successful and met with Nazi leader Herman Goring who gave him a medal for his accomplishments.

10. Private Life

Lindbergh was married to Anne Spencer Marrow and they had a child who was kidnapped and murdered. They left the country and spent some time in Europe where they waited until what became the Lindbergh law was passed and kidnapping became a federal crime.


27. You’re a Star!

The fame of Lindbergh following his flight across the ocean can’t be exaggerated. He could arguably be called one of the first celebrities in American history. He was flooded with adulation, attention, and job offers. According to one writer, the public responded, “as though Lindbergh had walked on water, not flown over it.”

foxnews

11 Things You Might Not Know About Charles Lindbergh

Before flying around the world was a daily occurrence, aviator Charles Lindbergh (1902-1974) made history by becoming the first person to complete a solo transatlantic flight in 1927. The feat made him a national hero, and then he became a tragic figure: The kidnapping of his infant son in 1932 remains one of the most indelible true-crime cases of the 20th century. Check out the following facts for more on Lindbergh’s life in and out of the cockpit.

1. HE GOT HIS START RIDING AIRPLANE WINGS.

Born in Detroit on February 4, 1902, Lindbergh spent his childhood in Washington, D.C., where his father, Charles August Lindbergh, was a congressman, as well as in Little Falls, Minnesota. While in Little Falls, he saw a “barnstormer,” or daredevil pilot, buzz into town. "Afterward, I remember lying in the grass and looking up at the clouds and thinking how much fun it would be to fly up there among those clouds," he later recalled.

The event was thought to have instilled a curiosity about air travel that lasted Lindbergh’s entire life. After dropping out of college at age 20, Lindbergh started working for the Nebraska Aircraft Corporation, which repaired and sold airplanes. While a fellow employee flew aircraft for publicity purposes, Lindbergh would step out onto the plane wing to attract even more attention. He later got his pilot’s license at the Army Air Service, graduating in 1925.

2. DELIVERING MAIL GAVE HIM NERVES OF STEEL.

In the early days of aviation, flying was considered a high-risk proposition. After serving as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army, Lindbergh took a job delivering airmail between St. Louis and Chicago. The expedited schedule meant Lindbergh and other pilots flew at night with poor visibility, had to push through inclement weather, and suffered from fatigue. Lindbergh learned to deal with many of the dangerous variables of piloting, which prepared him for an audacious goal: making a transatlantic flight solo.

While pilots John Alcock and Arthur Brown had made a nonstop transatlantic flight in June 1919 from Newfoundland to Ireland, it was only half the distance of Lindbergh's goal of flying from New York to Paris. A hotel owner named Raymond Orteig had offered a $25,000 prize to the first person to travel that route, but for several years, no one took him up on it—a testament to the fact that few believed it could be done.

3. HE COULDN’T SEE OUT OF HIS HISTORY-MAKING PLANE.

The Spirit of St. Louis displayed in the “Boeing Milestones of Flight Hall” in the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C. Eric Long, Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum

Lindbergh's decision to mount the first transatlantic flight from New York to Paris in 1927 required two elements: guts and technology. Lindbergh had developed the constitution for it, but still needed an aircraft that could make the 3600-mile flight. Financed by the St. Louis Chamber of Commerce, Lindbergh commissioned a $15,000 plane, dubbed The Spirit of St. Louis, to be built by the Ryan Airlines Corporation of San Diego. Because the plane needed additional fuel storage, everything extraneous was removed to lessen its weight—no radio, gas gauge, or parachute. Lindbergh even had to dispense with a window in his cockpit: The gas tank took over his front field of vision. He used a periscope to see instead.

The sacrifices were worth it. Lindbergh made the flight, lifting off from Roosevelt Field on Long Island on May 20, 1927, and arriving in Paris after 33.5 hours of uninterrupted flying. The feat captured the public's attention for its boundary-breaking significance, with thousands of people greeting his plane upon landing. Back home, president Calvin Coolidge awarded him the Congressional Medal of Honor.

4. HE STARTED HALLUCINATING, TOO.

Crossing the Atlantic Ocean demanded more of Lindbergh than just flying skill or customized aircraft. It required he stay awake for the duration of the solo flight and maintain concentration throughout. Halfway through, fatigue began to set in, and Lindbergh physically forced his eyes to remain open with his fingers. Shortly after that, he began hallucinating ghosts passing through his cockpit. Because he had slept so little the night before taking off, Lindbergh had actually been awake closer to 55 hours.

5. THE FLIGHT MADE HIM A MILLIONAIRE.

Although there was a $25,000 prize involved, Lindbergh’s real wealth came from the public’s mythologizing of the feat. City after city threw him celebratory parades, and he eventually made it to every state in the union to acknowledge their fascination with his achievement. Eager to understand both the pilot and the trip, they made his 1927 autobiography, We, a bestseller. Lindbergh also wrote articles about aviation for The New York Times. Together, the projects were said to have made him a millionaire.

6. PEOPLE MADE SOUVENIRS TO MARK HIS SON’S KIDNAPPING.

No abduction has captured the public’s attention quite like the 1932 taking of Charles Lindbergh III, whom press dubbed “Little Lindy.” The 20-month-old was seized from his second-floor bedroom in the Lindberghs’ home in Hopewell, New Jersey, on March 1. Ransom notes followed, and although Lindbergh paid, the child was never going to return: His body was found May 12, about 4.5 miles from the Lindbergh home. Police determined that he had been killed on the night of the kidnapping. During the trial of alleged perpetrator Bruno Hauptmann, one business decided to offer a morbid souvenir to the attending public: a tiny replica of the ladder Hauptmann used to climb into the baby's window. Author Maurice Sendak (Where the Wild Things Are) later purchased one. Sendak had long been fascinated with the case, which dominated headlines during his childhood.

7. HE RECEIVED AN AWARD FROM THE NAZIS.

Lindbergh’s feat drew worldwide acclaim and he frequently took up invitations from foreign countries to evaluate their aircraft development. In the late 1930s, Lindbergh made several trips to Nazi Germany, where he was granted access to the Luftwaffe's fleet of combat planes. At one point, Luftwaffe commander-in-chief Hermann Goering presented Lindbergh with the Service Cross of the German Eagle to acknowledge his pioneering work in aviation. Lindbergh promptly reported his experiences to U.S. intelligence, which had encouraged Lindbergh to make the visits and inform the American military of German technology.

8. HE WAS OPPOSED TO THE U.S. ENTERING WORLD WAR II.

Lindbergh gives a speech advocating neutrality in World War II. Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Despite the continued public adoration, Lindbergh managed to find himself in one major media disaster. He repeatedly voiced concerns over U.S. participation in World War II, believing that his country was ill-prepared to hold its own in European territory. In his most controversial comments, he told a crowd during a speech in Iowa in 1941 that the Jewish population was "pro war" as a result of the atrocities committed by Germans. Though he was prohibited from serving in the military by an irate President Franklin Roosevelt, Lindbergh wound up flying 50 combat missions in the Pacific for a private airplane contractor. The accusations of being pro-German or anti-Semitic followed him for the remainder of his life. In the early 1940s, his idea of American isolationism was even the target of satirical political cartoons by Theodore Geisel, otherwise known as Dr. Seuss. On a “Lindbergh quarter,” Seuss imagined an ostrich with its head in the ground instead of an eagle.

9. HE REFUSED TO CELEBRATE MOTHER’S DAY.

According to his daughter, Reeve Lindbergh, her father was no fan of manufactured holidays. Both Father’s Day and Mother’s Day, he said, were commercially driven and insincere, and he refused to acknowledge either one in the Lindbergh household. While his children were forced to cede to his wishes while he was present, his frequent trips allowed them to celebrate Mother’s Day in secret if he was away from home.

10. HE INVENTED AN INFLUENTIAL MEDICAL DEVICE.

Lindbergh had an interest in biomechanics, and in 1935, he unveiled his design for a perfusion pump—a glass device that could ostensibly keep organs viable by delivering a blood supply to them while they were outside the body. With collaborator and Nobel Prize-winning scientist Alexis Carrel, he succeeded in perfusing the thyroid gland of a cat. Though his invention never made it to a practical application stage, Lindbergh’s work is credited with helping bridge the gap toward innovations that later allowed surgeons to stop a heart during operations.

11. HE HAD A SECRET FAMILY (OR THREE).

Lindbergh’s travels to Germany were more than just business. In 2003, DNA tests confirmed that he had fathered three children with Munich hat maker Brigitte Hesshaimer beginning in 1957. Neither Hesshaimer nor Lindbergh disclosed that lineage to the children, who knew the man who came to visit them a few times a year as a writer named “Careu Kent.” The trio waited until their mother’s passing in 2001 before pursuing their suspicion that Kent was actually Lindbergh. The aviator was also alleged to have fathered two children with Brigitte’s sister, Marietta, and two with his personal secretary, a woman named Valeska.


Facts about Charles Lindbergh 9: Crime of the Century

There was a tragedy in the life of Lindbergh. It was dubbed as the Crime of Century when the infant son of Lindbergh named Charles Jr, was kidnapped and murdered in 1932. Find facts about Charles Kingsford Smith here.

Facts about Charles Lindbergh 10: the later years

In his later years, Lindbergh became an environmentalist, international explorer, prize winning author, and inventor.

Do you have any opinion on facts about Charles Lindbergh?


10 Fascinating Facts About Charles Lindbergh - HISTORY

Charles Martel was a Frankish statesman and military leader who as Duke and Prince of the Franks and Mayor of the Palace, was the de facto ruler of Francia from 718 until his death. The son of the Frankish statesman Pepin of Herstal and a noblewoman named Alpaida, Charles successfully asserted his claims to power as successor to his father as the power behind the throne in Frankish politics. Take a look below for 27 more awesome and interesting facts about Charles Martel.

1. Continuing and building on his father’s work, he restored centralized government in Francia and began the series of military campaigns that re-established the Franks as the undisputed masters of all Gaul.

2. After establishing unity in Gaul, Charles’ attention was called to foreign conflicts with the Islamic advance into Western Europe a foremost concern.

3. In October 732, the army of the Umayyad Caliphate led by Al Ghafiqi met Frankish and Burgundian forces under Charles between the cities of Tours and Politiers, leading to a decisive, historically important Frankish victory known as the Battle of Tours.

4. After the Battle of Tours, Charles took the offensive, destroying fortresses at Agde, Beziers and Maguelonne, and engaging Islamic forces at Nimes, though ultimately failing to recover Narbonne or to fully reclaim the Visigoth’s Narbonensis.

5. After, he made significant further gains against fellow Christian realms, establishing Frankish control over Bavaria, Alemannia, and Frisia, and compelling some of the Saxon tribes to offer tribute.

6. Apart from his military endeavors, Charles is considered to be a founding figure of the European Middle Ages.

7. Skilled as an administrator as well as a warrior, he’s credited with a seminal role in the emerging responsibilities of the knights of courts, and therefore, in the development of the Frankish system of feudalism.

8. Pope Gregory III, whose realm was being menaced by the Lombards, and who couldn’t rely on the help from Constantinople, asked Charles to defend the Holy See and offered him the Roman consulship, though Charles declined.

9. Charles divided Francia between his sons, Carloman and Pepin.

10. Charles’ grandson, Charlemagne, extended the Frankish realms to include much of the West, and became the first Emperor in the West since the fall of Rome.

11. “Martel” means “The Hammer.” He earned this name by enforcing his power through military strength.

12. Charles had to fight off several battles against other realms of Francis and his step mother, Plectrude, to finally restore the Kingdom to its former geographical shape in 718 AD.

13. In older historiography, it was common to describe Charles as “illegitimate.”

14. Charles married twice, his first wife being Rotrude of Treves, daughter either of Lambert II, Count of Hesbaye, or of Leudwinus, Count of Treves.

15. He had a known mistress, Ruodhaid, with whom he had three children with: Bernard, Hieronymus, and Remigius, the latter who became an archbishop of Rouen.

16. Charles is the father of heavy cavalry in Europe, as he integrated heavy armored cavalry into his forces.

17. His army was the first standing permanent army since the fall of Rome in 476. At its core was a body of tough, seasoned heavy infantry who displayed exceptional resolution at Tours.

18. Charles had taken the money and property he had seized from the church and paid local nobles to supply trained ready infantry year round.

19. It was Charles’ creation of a system whereby he could call on troops year round that gave the Carolingians the first standing and permanent army since Rome’s fall in the west.

20. The defeats that Charles inflicted on the Muslims were vital in that the split in the Islamic world left the Caliphate unable to mount an all-out attack on Europe via its Iberian stronghold after 750.

21. Just as his grandson, Charlemagne, would become famous for his swift and unexpected movements in his campaigns, Charles was renowned for never doing what his enemies forecast he would do, and for moving far faster than his opponents believed he could.

22. During the last years of his life, Charles divided his realm between his sons without opposition, though he ignored his youngest son Bernard.

23. Charles was a brilliant strategic general, who also was a tactical commander and was able, in the heat of battle, to adapt his plans to his foe’s forces and movement.

24. Charles had the last quality which defines genuine greatness in a military commander: he foresaw the dangers of his foes, and prepared for them with care.

25. He died on October 22, 741, at Quierzy-sur-Oise in what is today the Aisne department in the Picardy region of France.

26. He was buried at Saint Denis Basilica in Paris.

27. His territories had been divided among his adult sons a year earlier: to Carloman he gave Austrasia, Alemannia, and Thuringia, and to Pippin the Younger Neustria, Burgundy, Provence, and Metz and Trier in the “Mosel duchy” Grifo was given several lands throughout the kingdom, but at a later date, just before Charles died.


4 Ancient Egypt&rsquos Parasite Problem

When you think of the ancient Egyptians, you probably think of a few very specific things&mdashmighty pyramids, gold-plated coffins, those guys fanning pharaohs with giant palm fronds, and so on. What you probably don&rsquot think of, however, are bleeding penises. Until today.

The discovery of irrigation by the ancient Egyptians was a great one. It made farming possible, which, in turn, allowed their civilization to grow as powerful as it did. However, it also created large marshes, which were ideal habitats for Schistosoma haematobium, a parasitic worm that tended to burrow into the penises of farmers. Victims of the worms would experience not only pain but heavy bleeding from the penis as well. [7]

And these weren&rsquot just a few isolated incidents infection was so common among the farming lower class that the symptoms were believed to be a normal part of life. In fact, boys weren&rsquot considered &ldquomen&rdquo until they saw blood in their urine, as if it was the male equivalent of menstruation.


Biography


Charles Lindbergh with Spirit of St. Louis
Source: Library of Congress
  • Occupation: Aviator
  • Born: February 4, 1902 in Detroit, Michigan
  • Died: August 26, 1974 in Maui, Hawaii
  • Best known for: The first person to pilot a solo non-stop flight from New York to Paris

Where was Charles Lindbergh born?

Charles Lindbergh as born in Detroit, Michigan on February 4, 1902. His father was elected to the U.S. Congress when Charles was still a child. His mother was a schoolteacher. Charles spent much of his youth in Minnesota and Washington D.C. He enjoyed the outdoors while living on his family's farm in Minnesota.

Charles dreamed of one day becoming a pilot. After two years of college at the University of Wisconsin, he quit to take a job as an airplane mechanic. Then he took flying lessons and began to fly planes as a barnstormer. Barnstormers were pilots that traveled the country performing stunts and giving people rides at air shows.

In 1924, Charles joined the Army Air Service where he received formal training as a pilot. After graduating from the army's training school, he took a job as a mail pilot. This was a pretty dangerous job at the time because pilots had to navigate mostly by eyesight and they didn't know when they were flying into bad weather.

For many years Charles had dreamt of winning the Orteig Prize that would pay $25,000 to the first pilot to fly non-stop from New York to Paris. The prize was first offered in 1919, but by 1927, no one had successfully made the flight. Charles was sure he could complete the flight. He convinced several businessmen in St. Louis to help pay for a special airplane to be built.

On May 20, 1927 Charles took off from New York aboard his plane, the Spirit of St. Louis. For the next 33 1/2 hours Charles flew the plane towards Paris. It was a dangerous flight. He used the stars to navigate when possible, but sometimes he just had a compass to guide him. He had to fly through storm clouds, fog, and deal with ice. He also had to stay awake the entire 33 1/2 hours because he was the only one on the plane. Finally, Charles arrived in Paris. He was the first pilot to fly non-stop from New York to Paris.

The Spirit of St. Louis

The Spirit of St. Louis was designed specifically to make the transatlantic flight. It was longer than the average plane in order to hold 425 gallons of fuel. Lindbergh had it built with only a single engine. He knew having just one engine was risky, but felt that it gave him a better chance of success. The plane was built to be as aerodynamic as possible in order to make the fuel last longer. The cockpit was so small that Lindbergh couldn't stretch out his legs for the full 33 1/2 hour trip!

After completing the trip, Lindbergh became very famous. People across the world considered him to be a hero. He was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross by President Calvin Coolidge and a huge parade was held for him in New York City. He traveled around the world promoting aviation. It was during his travels that he met his wife, Anne. They married on May 27, 1929.

The Lindbergh Kidnapping

In 1932, tragedy struck the Lindbergh family. The Lindbergh's one year old son was kidnapped from their home in Hopewell, New Jersey. Sadly, the boy was found dead in the woods ten weeks later. After two years of investigating, the police arrested Bruno Hauptmann for the kidnapping. He was found guilty in what newspapers at the time called the "Trial of the Century."

When World War II began, Lindbergh was against the United States getting involved. However, after Pearl Harbor, he went to work for the U.S. Army as an advisor. He flew around 50 combat missions during the war and helped to test out new planes.

Charles Lindbergh died from cancer on August 26, 1974 on the island of Maui in Hawaii.


10 Fascinating Facts About Airplane Bathrooms

Even if you only fly first class, there’s no getting around the fact that moving your bowels at 36,000 feet is a bit of an ordeal. Airplane lavatories are cramped, turbulence can unseat you, and the line of people waiting just outside the flimsy door can make it difficult to relax.

Despite these drawbacks, airplane lavatories used to be much, much worse. Take a look at 10 facts we’ve uncovered about the past, present, and future of turds on the tarmac.

1. PASSENGERS USED TO CRAP IN BOXES.

iStock

No matter how boorish your seatmate might be or how loud the wail of the child behind you, be thankful you weren’t one of the earliest pilots or passengers during the aviation explosion of the 1930s and 1940s. Without tanks or separate bathroom compartments, anyone in flight would have make do with pooping in buckets or boxes that would sometimes overflow due to turbulence, splattering poop on the interior some pilots peed into their shoes or through a hole in the cockpit floor. The first removable bowls were seen at the end of the 1930s, with crew members having to come and empty them out after landing. Removable tanks followed in the 1940s.

2. THE BRITISH POOPED RIGHT INTO THE SKY.

In 1937, a “flying boat” dubbed the Supermarine Stranraer was put into service by Britain’s Royal Air Force. It didn’t take long for the craft to earn a nickname, the “whistling sh-t House,” owing to one curious design choice: The toilet onboard had no tank or reservoir and opened up to the sky below. If the lid remained open, the passing air would prompt the plane to make a whistling noise.

3. CHARLES LINDBERGH PEED ON FRANCE.

Central Press/Getty Images

Famous aviator Charles Lindbergh completed his transatlantic flight from New York to Paris in 1927 and met with King George V shortly after touching down. The 33-hour flight led him to ask Lindbergh how he had managed his bodily demands during that time Lindbergh replied that he had peed into an aluminum container and then dropped it while flying over France.

4. FALLING FROZEN POOP WAS A BIG PROBLEM IN THE ‘80S.

As aviation become more sophisticated, toilets went from merely trying to contain poop to actively trying to fight germs with Anotec, the brand name for the “blue liquid” found in freestanding bowls. Unfortunately, the tanks housing the liquid and the waste were sometimes prone to leakage in the air, prompting giant biohazards to freeze on the hull of planes and then break away as the aircraft began its descent. The apocalyptic poop balls reportedly smashed cars and roofs before Boeing and other manufacturers adopted the vacuum system still in use today.

5. THERE'S BEEN ONE CASE OF CATASTROPHIC GENITAL INJURY.

iStock

The current pneumatic vacuum system toilets use pressure to siphon waste from the bowl without using much liquid, which keeps the plane from having to carry the additional weight of waste water in the sky. The noise of the violent suction can be unsettling, but it’s rare you’d actually be in any danger. Rare, but not impossible.

An article in the Journal of Travel Medicine in July 2006 [PDF] reported one case of misadventure due to an airplane toilet. A 37-year-old woman flushed while still seated and created a seal, trapping her on the commode. After being freed by flight attendants, she was examined by doctors and was found to have a labial laceration that resulted in “substantial” blood loss. She was treated and recovered fully.

6. THERE’S A TRICK TO AVOID STINKING UP THE PLANE.

No one wants to be the person who exits a lavatory having polluted the pressurized cabin with a foul odor. According to an ex-flight attendant named Erika Roth, asking an employee for a bag of coffee grounds and then hanging them in the bathroom can help absorb any odors produced by your activities.

7. AIRBUS TOILETS CAN REACH POOP SPEEDS OF 130 MPH.

Dubbed the “Formula 1” of airplane toilets, certain Airbus models circa 2007 could produce unbelievable suctioning power. In a demonstration for a journalist (above), their A380 model could move sewage at speeds of 130 miles per hour. The speeds are necessary when bathroom waste needs to travel the length of the passenger cabin to the sewage tanks in the back.

8. THEY’RE GETTING SMALLER.

Already short on space, airplane lavatories might become even more cramped in the future. A 2017 report by Condé Nast Traveler indicated that as older planes are taken out of service, newer-model passenger planes are coming in with modified bathrooms that are up to two inches smaller in width and depth. Industry observers believe the shrinking bathrooms could pose problems for people with disabilities, pregnant women, and those who need to accompany their child into the bathroom.

9. BOEING MIGHT HAVE PERFECTED THE AIRPLANE POOP EXPERIENCE.

Boeing

In 2016, the aeronautics company announced a possible solution to the germ-infested poop closets found on planes. Their self-cleaning lavatory uses ultraviolet light to kill 99.9 percent of all surface bacteria. The light would be activated between occupancies to sanitize the space for travelers. Boeing also envisions this lavatory of the future to be touchless, with a self-activating seat and sink.

10. THERE’S A REASON THEY STILL HAVE ASHTRAYS.

Ever wonder why airplane bathrooms have ashtrays built into the wall or door even though smoking is banned on virtually all flights? Because federal regulations still require them. The thinking is that someone sneaking a smoke will still need a place to put it out, and the risk of fire is reduced if they have a proper receptacle.


Watch the video: HISTORY CHANNEL Documentary: The Secret Lives of Charles Lindbergh 2009