Aristotle's Tomb Found in Greece

Aristotle's Tomb Found in Greece


Aristotle's Tomb Found in Greece - History

The discovery of the tomb of Aristotle was announced by archaeologist Kostas Sismanidis

Greek archaeologists announced they have discovered the tomb of ancient Greek philosopher, and one the greatest in the world, Aristotle. After years of meticulous excavations at the ancient site of Stagira, located in central Macedonia, near the eastern coast of the Chalkidiki peninsula, archaeologists said that the domed building and altar unearthed in 1996 belong to the great philosopher.

The discovery of the tomb of Aristotle was announced by archaeologist Kostas Sismanidis, according to whom the findings from the excavation of 1996 in the region point to the conclusion that the tomb belongs to Aristotle.

‘I have no hard proof, but strong indications lead me to almost certainty’, said archaeologist Kostas Sismanidis. He claimed all the indications, from the location of the tomb, the period it was erected, its public character are conclusive that the edifice is indeed Aristotle’s tomb.


Aristotle’s Tomb Said To Have Been Discovered In Stagira, Greece

Archaeologists have announced that they have discovered the tomb of Aristotle in Ancient Stagira, Central Macedonia.

The ancient Greek city was known to be the birthplace of the great philosopher who was born 2400 years ago in 384 BC, though he was previously believed to have been buried in Chalcis on the island of Evia, the site of his death in 322 BC. However, literary sources – including Manuscript 257 of the Biblioteca Marciana as well as an Arabic biography of Aristotle – had posed the possibility that the people of Stagira had transferred his ashes back to his birthplace.

A pupil of Plato, Aristotle was a phenomenally gifted scientist, as well as a philosopher. His writings cover a vast array of subjects, from biology to physics, ethics to aesthetics, metaphysics to zoology, and are collectively considered to be the first major bedrock of Western philosophy, as well as having a profound influence on the thinking of Muslim scholars across the Middle East, amongst whom he earned the title ‘The First Teacher.’ Sadly, it is believed that only a third of all his work has survived into the modern world.

The latest announcement has proved to be the biggest news to emerge from the 20-year excavation at the ancient site in Stagira, which has also wielded ceramics from the royal pottery workshops and 50 coins dating to the time of Alexander the Great, who lived from 356 BC to 323 BC. Alexander was himself a pupil of Aristotle during his teenage years, a post Aristotle agreed to in exchange for Alexander’s father’s promise to rebuild Stagira, having previously razed it, and to secure the freedom of its ex-citizens who had been taken into slavery or exiled.

Speculation had been mounting regarding the dig, with the official announcement being made on the fourth day of the Aristotle 2400 Years World Congress, which has been taking place at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, about 34 miles west of the ancient site at Stagira.

Archeologist Kostas Sismanidis, who has been working on the dig site, has explained that though there is no hard proof that marks the tomb as belonging to Aristotle, there are very strong indications that have led him to the point of near certainty, including the location, the period of its erection, the panoramic view, the public nature of the architecture, and other construction details.

The domed building and altar were unearthed by archeologists in 1996, the tomb having been previously destroyed by the Byzantines and replaced with a square tower.


Archaeologist Claims To Have Found Aristotle's Tomb

A Greek archaeologist is "almost certain" that he has found the tomb of Aristotle, some 2,300 years after the philosopher's death in 322 B.C.

Archaeologist Kostas Sismanidis beieves the tomb is inside a horseshoe-shaped, domed building in the ancient Greek seaside city of Stagira, where Aristotle was born in 384 B.C. He made the announcement Thursday at the "Aristotle 2400 Years" World Congress, a conference for international Aristotelian scholars held in the city of Thessaloniki.

While he has no solid proof that the tomb belonged to Aristotle, Sismanidis says the location matches a physical description of Aristotle's tomb from an 11th century A.D., Arabic-language biography of the philosopher, which claims that the people of Stagira placed the philosopher's ashes into an urn and took them back to their home city for safekeeping.

"We think, without having proof but only strong indications, that it all points towards this theory" that this is the philosopher's final resting place, Sismanidis said at the conference.

Some have expressed doubt about the claims.

"The urge to connect the material evidence with personalities known from our historical and literary canon is enormously strong for all kinds of reasons, so we have to be extra careful in these cases, to protect against our natural inclination to want to 'connect the dots,'" said Dimitri Nakassis, a classics professor at the University of Toronto. "In this case at least we know this monument is in Stageira, Aristotle's home town, so that makes the identification more likely. But the general point remains: anyone working in Stageira is going to want to make a connection to Aristotle, so we have good reasons to want to be extra careful."

Greek radio station Sto Kokkino reported that Sismanidis' discovery was a result of over 20 years' excavation and research. The archaeologist claimed to have found Aristotle's tomb back in 1996, the outlet noted. He has officially retired since then, but continued to work on the site to confirm his hypothesis.

The philosopher was originally believed to be buried in Chalcis, a town on the Greek island of Euboea, where he died of a stomach disease. Stagira and Chalcis are over 300 miles away from each other.

Danae Leivada contributed to this report.

CORRECTION: This story has been updated to reflect Dimitri Nakassis' position at the University of Toronto.


Among the stones of his birthplace, the famous philosopher becomes less mythical, more real, and all the more astounding for it.

Halkidiki is known as a prime destination for beach holidays. Curiously, it’s not very well known for the most important thing by far to have happened here – Ancient Stageira, at the peninsula’s eastern edge, is the birthplace of Aristotle. We are on a tour called “The Footsteps of Aristotle”with Tassos Papadopoulos (of Thessaloniki Walking Tours), who has a way of making history tangible and fresh. Metaphorically and geographically, we are bypassing the Halkidiki of popular culture, cutting straight across its serene top with lakes of glass and hills dotted with haystacks. As we follow the sign for Mt Athos, the forests deepen, the road climbs and twists and the view opens to the sea. A hilly, verdant peninsula is off to the left. This is Ancient Stageira, a rich archaeological site in a setting that, even for Greece, is extraordinary—all the more so for appearing nearly untouched. At the peninsula’s northern edge is the small village of Olympiada to the south, the only visible signs of contemporary civilization are the stakes of a mussel farm jutting out of the sea. In the distance is the island of Thasos nearer still is Kapros—an islet named for the wild boar which, with if you really use your imagination, it resembles. The kapros was the sacred animal of ancient Stageira, appearing on their coins (rarest of rare) and, in a half boar/half lion version, over the city’s gate.

If we are to be honest, the heritage we are here to explore in Aristotle’s home city is not just historical and archaeological, but also personal. “How can we live a fulfilling life? How can we live virtuously and well?” Our tour starts with this question Aristotle was the only one who addressed it directly, concretely. We apply his ideas and his ideals to daily life, or at least we try to. This is how he remains current, relevant, and why from antiquity until the Enlightenment, he was the dominant figure in Western thought.

We’re here to get to know him better, to gaze out at the same views he gazed at while he was becoming who he was. Here among the stones of his childhood (and, somewhere nearby, his own bones, brought back here not long after his death), Aristotle becomes less mythical, more real, and all the more astounding for it.

“If we are to be honest, the heritage we are here to explore in Aristotle’s home city is not just historical and archaeological, but also personal. ”

View of the coastline from the walls of the north hill.

© Ephorate of Antiquities of Chalkidiki and Mount Athos/Hellenic Republic, Ministry of Culture and Sports/Archaeological Receipts Fund

View of the coastline from the walls of the north hill.

© Ephorate of Antiquities of Chalkidiki and Mount Athos/Hellenic Republic, Ministry of Culture and Sports/Archaeological Receipts Fund

“You come upon things as if you were the first ever to come upon them – it feels more like discovering than sightseeing.”

We start our tour outside the walls of the acropolis, the fortification for military use that was a refuge in times of siege. It’s a special wall, intricate and beautiful in composition and texture — shelves of slate are supported by large stones of marble at staggered intervals, the space between them filled with smaller stones of a third color. Polychromatic, varyingly textured, and with a dynamic rhythm, it is not a style commonly seen among ruins of ancient Greece. Our story and our journey begin here, with Aristotle’s birth into a well-connected family. His father, Nicomachos, was court physician to King Amyntas III (father of Philip II) of Macedonia (his mother, Phaistis, a woman of property from Chalcis in Evia). This relationship with the Macedonian royal family would become pivotal for him, and for Stageira itself.

The ruins are extensive, rambling over the city’s two hills. There is plenty for the imagination to go on, and faithful reconstructions have been added as well. A clay line in the walls clearly delineates the ancient from the restored, but subtly enough so that you can appreciate both the authentic and the augmented. Signage is discreet, minimal, and there are no fences or ropes. You come upon things as if you were the first ever to come upon them – it feels more like discovering than sightseeing. Soon we find the entirely intact foundations of a large, many-roomed house (like Aristotle’s perhaps) that would have looked out onto views of the southern bay. We follow the view to the ruins of entire complexes and the clear traces of the rounded walls of a tower. From the edge of the cliff, we can clearly see Kapros, looking wild and untouched. It’s not, though it is actually packed with antiquities, as well as some Byzantine ruins.

Back up the hill, the ruins taper off, the foliage thickens, and soon we are in the woods, walking down a path thickly carpeted with leaves. It feels like we’ve left the ruins for the wilderness, but we are still within the walls and what appears untouched is actually – like Kapros – a great cache of finds waiting to be excavated. The woods themselves are key to Stageira’s story: in the 7th century BC, Stageira was settled by colonists from Andros, an island of seafarers, for purposes of trade and war. Their island was dry, rocky and in need of a colony rich in resources. Andros’ fleets were built from Stageira’s forests, and their naval campaigns funded by Stageira’s gold.

The walls of the city’s 5th century expansion to the south hill are of an unusually intricate construction.

© Ephorate of Antiquities of Chalkidiki and Mount Athos/Hellenic Republic, Ministry of Culture and Sports/Archaeological Receipts Fund

The walls of the city’s 5th century expansion to the south hill are of an unusually intricate construction.

© Ephorate of Antiquities of Chalkidiki and Mount Athos/Hellenic Republic, Ministry of Culture and Sports/Archaeological Receipts Fund

The wilderness among the ruins is rich with finds waiting for excavation.

© Ephorate of Antiquities of Chalkidiki and Mount Athos/Hellenic Republic, Ministry of Culture and Sports/Archaeological Receipts Fund

The wilderness among the ruins is rich with finds waiting for excavation.

© Ephorate of Antiquities of Chalkidiki and Mount Athos/Hellenic Republic, Ministry of Culture and Sports/Archaeological Receipts Fund

Ruins of Stageira's grand ancient temple

© Ephorate of Antiquities of Chalkidiki and Mount Athos/Hellenic Republic, Ministry of Culture and Sports/Archaeological Receipts Fund

Ruins of Stageira's grand ancient temple

© Ephorate of Antiquities of Chalkidiki and Mount Athos/Hellenic Republic, Ministry of Culture and Sports/Archaeological Receipts Fund

The people of Andros settled the site’s northern hill in the 7th century BC, while the southern hill was developed two centuries later, as the population grew. Now we’re on the crest of the north hill, at one of Stageira’s most significant features: the temple. The intact foundation is formidable (one excavated side extends 30m). Stones of a Byzantine church built on top still remain, but command less of a presence. Deeply charred stone suggests that marble was incinerated to produce lime (calcium oxide), a building material that the Byzantines of AD 1000 may have valued more than the classical statues they most likely destroyed to make it. The few remnants from the original structure that have survived make it easy to fill in the enormous gaps, though certainly it was once a splendid temple.

For much of his life, Aristotle did not live in Stageira. He left for the Academy in Athens when he was 17 (367 BC), and spent the next twenty years there. When Plato died, it wasn’t Aristotle who succeeded him, but Plato’s nephew Speusippus. Aristotle left Athens and spent the next years inventing taxonomy and biology with his friend Theophrastus of Eresos, in Lesbos. Why did he go there instead of back to Stageira? For one thing, there was no Stageira to return to the year before Aristotle left the Academy, Philip II of Macedonia (on the throne since 359 BC) destroyed it completely during his successful military campaign in Halkidiki. Stageira’s relevance as the city of Aristotle deepened with this dramatic episode – thanks only to his love for his hometown was Stageira ultimately reborn. When Aristotle finally came north again, in 343 BC, it was to tutor Philip’s heir, Alexander the Great. Apparently, Aristotle commanded his employer’s great regard: he asked Philip to rebuild Stageira, and Philip did.

“The few remnants from the original structure that have survived make it easy to fill in the enormous gaps, though certainly it was once a splendid temple.”

Stageira’s rugged coastline and pristine waters as viewed from the air.

© Ephorate of Antiquities of Chalkidiki and Mount Athos/Hellenic Republic, Ministry of Culture and Sports/Archaeological Receipts Fund

Stageira’s rugged coastline and pristine waters as viewed from the air.

© Ephorate of Antiquities of Chalkidiki and Mount Athos/Hellenic Republic, Ministry of Culture and Sports/Archaeological Receipts Fund

“A mind that had devoted itself to exploring every knowable thing of the natural world, to ethics, metaphysics and poetics, turned itself in his last weeks towards the well-being of his personal servants.”

This strong relationship with the Macedonian court may have secured Aristotle’s important next step. In 336 BC, Alexander succeeded Philip (stabbed to death at his daughter’s wedding) and, before starting a career of dazzling campaigns that spread Hellenism far and wide, sent Aristotle back to Athens to found his own Lyceum. There, famously, he lectured strolling with his students. They came to be called “peripatetics” (from the Greek word for walking): those who lecture or learn while walking.

Leaving the temple, we pass through shrubbery to arrive at the city’s gate, a place of particular archaeological interest because here there are ruins from all of Stageira’s incarnations: the original colony of Andros, the city rebuilt by Philip and the Byzantine city erected centuries later.Nearby is our final stop: ancient Stageira’s place of public debate, the Stoa (a roofed portico). We sit on the very benches they did, with the bases of the eight columns that once supported the roof standing before us. We’ve been brought to the center of civic life to hear an official document. When Alexander was killed in 323 BC, Aristotle’s relationship with the Macedonian court became a liability. The voicing of anti-Macedonian sentiment was spreading unchecked. Aristotle had been accused of blasphemy and, in order to avert “another insult to Philosophy” (referring to the execution of Socrates), he departed for Chalcis, to lands left to him by his mother. He fell ill, however, and it was there he wrote his will, from which Tassos reads us excerpts.

The tomb, found near Stageira’s central marketplace and city gate

© Ephorate of Antiquities of Chalkidiki and Mount Athos/Hellenic Republic, Ministry of Culture and Sports/Archaeological Receipts Fund

The tomb, found near Stageira’s central marketplace and city gate

© Ephorate of Antiquities of Chalkidiki and Mount Athos/Hellenic Republic, Ministry of Culture and Sports/Archaeological Receipts Fund

Sitting on the benches of public debate in the town of Aristotle’s birth, hearing the thoughts of this immortal man as he confronted his own mortality with practicality and thoughtfulness, was deeply touching. Ancient Greece has never seemed less of an abstraction, never more vivid than in listening to the philosopher’s genuine concerns for people in the world he would soon be leaving. A mind that had devoted itself to exploring every knowable thing of the natural world, to ethics, metaphysics and poetics, turned itself in his last weeks towards the well-being of his personal servants. In this, we can see him as a person who was the embodiment of the ethics he set forth, the same ethics that we hope guide us still. We started the tour in awe of Aristotle, but now, in addition to our admiration and respect, we find also a deep liking for him. Aristotle died in Chalcis, but the people of Stageira reclaimed his bones, and brought these remains back here.

There is time for further reflection as we wind down the hill in all its lushness. We have one more stop – new Stageira – where there is a park dedicated to Aristotle. It’s filled with activities that allow us to experience various phenomena of physics and of perception that were observed and recorded by the world’s first true scientist. Here, the sobriety of our reflections is surprisingly easy to cast off. We go about the park like children now… Spinning discs with optical illusions, playing on a huge five-tone granite xylophone, creating mad vortexes in a tube of water, whispering to one another across a great distance in order to appreciate the magic of acoustics. We enjoy our hands-on experience of the world – a happy tribute to this most pragmatic of philosophers. There is a large marble statue in the park, but the pedestal does not read “Aristotle” it simply states “The Stageirite”.

“In this, we can see him as a person who was the embodiment of the ethics he set forth, the same ethics that we hope guide us still.”


Archaeologists in Greece Think They Found Aristotle’s Tomb

The archaeologists had been digging for 20 years at a site in the ancient northern Greece city of Stageira, where Aristotle was born in 384 B.C. Aristotle died 62 years later in Chalcis, about 50 miles north of Athens. 

Ahead of the official announcement, the Greek Reporter has some more details on the tomb, saying that “literary sources” say that Aristotle’s ashes were transferred there after his death. It is located near the ancient city’s agora, apparently intended to be viewed by the public. 

The top of the dome is at 10 meters and there is a square floor surrounding a Byzantine tower. A semi-circle wall stands at two-meters in height. A pathway leads to the tomb’s entrance for those that wished to pay their respects. Other findings included ceramics from the royal pottery workshops and fifty coins dated to the time of Alexander the Great.

Not much is known about Aristotle’s life, aside from what he left in his own writings. It took over 2,300 years, but at least we’re starting to learn more about his death. 


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The tomb has been found in the Ancient Stagira region of Greece (pictured on map)

Speaking to Sigma Live, Kostas Sismanidis, one of the archaeologists taking part in the excavation said: 'I have no hard proof, but strong indications lead me to almost certainty.'

A statue of Aristotle (pictured) sits in the mountain village of Stagira on the peninsula of Chalcidice in Greece

The archaeologists have claimed that all the indications, from the location of the tomb, to the period it was erected, suggest that the edifice is indeed Aristotle's tomb.

The tomb was probably unknown before now as it was destroyed by Byzantines, who built a square tower on top of it.

Aristotle was born in Stagira in 384 BC and died in Chalcis, Evia, at 322 BC.

The great philosopher was originally believed to have been buried at Chalcis, however, archaeologists are now certain that the tomb they have found belongs to Aristotle.

The researchers suggest that the people of Stagira may have transferred his ashes to his birthplace.

The tomb is a mounded dome with a marble floor dating back to the Hellenistic period between 323 BC and 32 BC.

The nature of the building suggests that it was initially constructed in a hurried fashion, but was then later topped with quality materials.

Outside the tomb, there is an altar and a square-shaped floor - presumably placed there for people to pray for Aristotle.

The tomb is 32 feet (10 metres) high, and the main square floor surrounds a Byzantine tower - the architectural style of the Later Roman era.

There also appears to be a pathway leading up to the tomb's entrance, which was probably there for those that wished to pay their respects.

Other findings included ceramics from the royal pottery workshops and fifty coins dated to the time of Alexander the Great.

THE LEGACY OF ARISTOTLE

Aristotle was an ancient Greek philosopher and scientist who was a student of Plato and Socrates.

His writings cover many subjects, including physics, biology, zoology, metaphysics, logic, ethics, aesthetics, poetry, theater, music, rhetoric, linguistics, politics and government.

These constitute the first comprehensive system of Western philosophy.

Shortly after Plato died, Aristotle left Athens and tutored Alexander the Great starting from 343 BC.

According to the Encyclopedia Britannica: 'Aristotle was the first genuine scientist in history and every scientist is in his debt.'


ɺristotle's tomb' discovered by archaeologist

A Greek archaeologist believes he may have discovered Aristotle’s tomb.

Konstantinos Sismanidis excavated the birthplace of the ancient philosopher in northern Greece in the 1990s, and now thinks that a destroyed structure he came across may have been the last resting place of the teacher of Alexander the Great.

Addressing a conference in the Greek port city of Thessaloniki – held to mark the 2,400 th anniversary of Aristotle’s birth this week – he said he had “no proof but just strong indications, as certain as one can be”, to support his theory.

Mr Sismanidis said the arched structure was unearthed in the ruins of Stageira, 40 miles east of Thessaloniki, and was once a public monument where Aristotle was honoured after his death – but that his remains had not been unearthed there.

He said the location of the structure, its view, its positioning at the centre of a square marble floor, and its estimated time of construction all pointed to it having been a shrine to the philosopher.

The archaeologist also quoted medieval references to Aristotle’s ashes being interred in his hometown.


Greek archaeologist claims he's found tomb of Aristotle

THESSALONIKI, Greece -- A Greek archaeologist who excavated the birthplace of Aristotle in northern Greece in the 1990s says a destroyed structure he discovered may have been the tomb of the ancient philosopher and teacher of Alexander the Great.

Konstantinos Sismanidis concedes that he has "no proof but just strong indications" to back up his theory, presented Thursday at a conference marking the 2,400th anniversary of the philosopher's birth.

Aristotle (384-322 B.C.) was a pupil of Plato and one of history's most influential thinkers.

Sismanidis said the structure unearthed in the ruins of Stageira, 43 miles east of Thessaloniki, was once a public monument where Aristotle was honored after his death. No human remains were found there.

Sismanidis also quoted medieval references to Aristotle's ashes being interred in his hometown.

First published on May 26, 2016 / 3:44 PM

© 2016 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


Archaeologists Believe They’ve Discovered Aristotle’s 2,400-year-old Tomb in Macedonia

Archaeologists believe they’ve found Aristotle’s tomb in Stagira, a town in central Macedonia in northern Greece.

A team of researchers say the 2,400-year-old tomb was excavated as part of a 20-year exploration of the site of ancient Stagira, where one of the world’s greatest philosophers was born in 384 BC.

Aristotle is regarded as the one of the most important thinkers in the history of Western Civilization. He died in 322 BC at Chalcis, Evia, and was long believed to have been buried there.

However, archaeologists who are excavating Stagira are now certain the tomb they have found belonged to Aristotle, whose ashes could have been transferred there, according to two literary sources.

The tomb is a mounded dome about 32 feet high, with a marble floor dated to the Hellenistic period, reported the Greek Reporter website — which published several photos taken at the site.

It’s located in the center of Stagira, with sweeping 360-degree views, which signifies the importance of the location.

But archaeologists say evidence suggests the tomb was hastily constructed and later finished with higher quality materials.

The findings were presented at the ‘Aristotle 2,400 Years World Congress’ which is currently underway in Thessaloniki.

A pathway leads to the entrance of the tomb, which was destroyed by the Christian Byzantines, who built a tower on top of it, according to the archeologists who made the discovery.

Aristotle, who studied under the great philosopher Plato, is regarded as the first genuine scientist in human history.

His writings cover many subjects, including physics, biology, zoology, metaphysics, logic, ethics, aesthetics, poetry, theater, music, rhetoric, linguistics, politics and government.

He tutored Alexander the Great, who spread Greek philosophy to Africa and the Middle East.

According to the Encyclopedia Britannica: ‘Aristotle was the first genuine scientist in history and every scientist is in his debt.’


Aristotle’s tomb, uncovered at his birthplace of Stagira after years of meticulous excavations, is the most important finding to come from a 20-year dig at the site. Greek archaeologists have little doubt that the 2,400-year-old tomb is that of the great philosopher born in the region located in central Macedonia, near the eastern coast of the Chalkidiki peninsula, in 384 BC.

The domed construction was found in the ancient city in 1996. Excavation data and old literary sources converge as evidence that the domed construction with marble flooring that dates back to the Hellenistic period was built for Aristotle. His tomb was originally believed to be located between Chalcis and Eretria in Evia where he died in 322 BC. However his ashes were transported back to the place where he was born by residents of Stagira, who honored Aristotle as a hero, savior, legislator and second founder of their city thanks to the philosopher’s mediation with King Philip of Macedon in 340 BC to re-establish the city after it was destroyed, by the same king, in 349 BC.

The astonishing news is expected to be made official in an announcement on Thursday, May 26 at the ‘Aristotle 2,400 years’ Conference ’ at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. “I have no hard proof, but strong indications lead me to almost certainty”, said archaeologist Kostas Sismanidis. He claimed that all the indications, from the location of the tomb, the period it was erected and its public character are conclusive that the edifice is indeed Aristotle’s tomb.

“However his ashes were transported back to the place where he was born by residents of Stagira, who honored Aristotle as a hero, savior, legislator and second founder of their city.”

A 3d representation of the monument reconstructs what it might have looked like A 3d representation of the monument reconstructs what it might have looked like

The tomb structure was found between the arcades of the temples of Zeus Soteros (5th century BC) and Athena Sotera (6th century BC) at the “Liotopi” peninsula. The vaulted top view (10 meters), its shape, the marble rectangular floor with an empty altar (1.30ࡧ.70 meter) had troubled the investigating archeologist as it surrounded a square Byzantine tower.

The tomb’s structure had been destroyed during the Byzantium. All that was left standing was a two-meter semi-circular wall. The structure originally had a roof with tiles constructed at the royal pottery workshops, confirming the tomb’s public character. A wide road lead to the tomb’s entrance making it accessible to those wishing to pay their respects.

Other findings include ceramics, more than 50 coins that date the tomb to the time of Alexander the Great . Literary sources point to Aristotle as the tomb’s occupant with text no. 257 of the Marciana library and an Arabic biography referring to the transfer of Aristotle’s remains by people from Stagira. They were carried from Chalcis to Stagira in a bronze urn that was buried in a large mounded tomb within the city. Next to it, they erected an altar and called the area “Aristoteleion”. The site became the meeting spot of the council.

On Friday, 250 participants of the “Aristotle 2,400 Years” conference from 40 countries will visit the area. The conference is organized by the Interdisciplinary Center for Aristotle Studies of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki.

“The tomb’s structure had been destroyed during the Byzantium. All that was left standing was a two-meter semi-circular wall. A wide road lead to the tomb’s entrance making it accessible to those wishing to pay their respects.”


Watch the video: Archaeologists discover huge ancient tomb in Greece